Saturday, May 17, 2014

Classic Colt's preview...

Colt's New Line .22 Pocket Revolver
Sorry for the flat and unsexy mug shot, but I saw this the 1876-vintage New Line .22 the other day at my LGS with a $99 price tag on it and had to pick it up, if only to serve as an illustration in the forthcoming big post on these two:

S&W Model 1, 3rd Issue (top) and 2nd Issue (bottom)
When the Rollin White patent for bored-through cylinders expired in 1872, it ended Smith & Wesson's lock on this new technology, and Colt's was ready to jump in and compete. While there was an initial run of open-topped "Old Line" Colt pocket revolvers, the solid-topstrap bronze-framed "New Line" .22 seven-shooter pictured at top was intended as a head-to-head competitor for the tiny Smith Model 1 revos.
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8 comments:

will_1400 said...

What kind of brass (I assume it's brass) are you using in that pic to show the scale of the revos?

Keads said...

Very nice!

Tam said...

Will,

I think it's .38 Spl...

Tam said...

Derp. Almost certainly .357

TBeck said...

Did that purchase require the usual paperwork or was it a simple cash transaction due to the age of the specimen?

Old NFO said...

Those are real pieces of history, thanks for sharing these! THey all look like they were ridden hard and put up wet, but I'm betting they all still work!

jed said...

Hi Tam.

Gonna miss your other blog.

Wishing you the best.

Tony Tsquared said...

Tam, This is way off base as I am commenting on your G37, Glockin in the Free world , post on View from the porch. I have been shooting the G37 since it came out with support from a few Glock employees in Smyrna who are personal friends.

For more effectiveness you need to up you bullet weight to 200 grain. For store bought ammo the trade off will be a lower FPS but the energy is about the same. The big difference is the 200 grain bullet stabilizes a bit better than the the 185 and 230 grain bullets so you will end up with a tighter grouping.

The other drawback is that Hydra-shocks are not available in 200 grain but Speer Gold Dot does quite nicely but is at a lower fps than your 185 Hydro-shocks and has similar results in ballistic gel. I hand load and for personal protection rounds I like a 200 grain JHP V-crown with 5.7 gr of Bullseye powder and it gives me 1024 fps with a tight grouping and more damage to ballistic gel than a 185 hydro-shock. I have loaded hotter rounds but the 5.7 grain load has the best stability with effective penetration.

If you you would like more info on the 45GAP you have my email in the moderation info.